iTunes for Windows available for download from Microsoft Store
iTunes for Windows available for download from Microsoft Store  AppleInsideriTunes Finally Debuts in the Microsoft Store  FortuneiTunes is now available in the Microsoft Store for Windows 10  The...
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U of A scientists use dinosaur teeth to discover how big lizards hunted
U of A scientists use dinosaur teeth to discover how big lizards hunted  Globalnews.caDinosaurs' tooth wear sheds light on their predatory lives  EurekAlert (press release)Dinosaur Teeth Show...
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Which are smarter, cats or dogs? We asked a scientist
Which are smarter, cats or dogs? We asked a scientist  PBS NewsHourFull coverage
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Fortnite Season 4 Battle Pass Theme Might Be Superheroes
Fortnite Season 4 Battle Pass Theme Might Be Superheroes  GameSpotWatch Meteors Hitting The Ground And Exploding In 'Fortnite: Battle Royale'  ForbesFortnite's Tilted Towers is Being Battered by...
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Facebook, Microsoft follow suit, replace gun emoji with a water pistol
Facebook, Microsoft follow suit, replace gun emoji with a water pistol  Digital TrendsApple made a controversial change in 2016 — but now all of Silicon Valley...
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Xbox made $2.25 billion for Microsoft last quarter
Xbox made $2.25 billion for Microsoft last quarter  VentureBeatThe Week's Best Gaming Deals So Far On All Platforms  GameSpotSeveral Star Wars Games and Xbox Classics Now Available...
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Penn State CNEU Nanotechnology Summer School to Aid Students Impacted by Hurricane Maria
Penn State CNEU Nanotechnology Summer School to Aid Students Impacted by Hurricane Maria  Newswise (press release)Full coverage
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A study of Monterey Canyon’s microbial denizens may offer insights on evolution
Geobiologist Victoria Orphan stands at the stern of the research vessel Western Flyer, watching her colleagues put the last touches on an unusual spread. Among...
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NanoMRI Gets Real

By Dexter Johnson Illustration: B.A. Moores Many of us are acquainted with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but you may not have heard of nanoMRI a technology that can image viruses and cells for in-depth analysis. Up until now, nanoMRI has been a long and laborious process, in which a single …

Mud-Fueled Smart Sensors for the Bottom of the Ocean

By Crispin Andrews Photo: University of Michigan, Ann ArborBacteria in mud power tiny sensors. If you put tiny electrodes in the mud on the ocean floor, you can harvest enough energy to power a tiny sensor platform that can monitor what’s going on at those depths. So say researchers from …

Medical Microbots Take a Fantastic Voyage Into Reality

By Rachel Courtland Photo-Illustration: Dan Saelinger; Prop: Swell In the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage , scientists at a U.S. laboratory shrink a submarine called Proteus and its human crew to microscopic size and then inject the vessel into an ailing scientist. Once inside, Proteus motors its way through the bloodstream …

A new tool measures the distance between phonon collisions

By Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office Today’s computer chips pack billions of tiny transistors onto a plate of silicon within the width of a fingernail. Each transistor, just tens of nanometers wide, acts as a switch that, in concert with others, carries out a computer’s computations. As dense forests …

California’s Quake Worries Don’t End With the San Andreas

By Katie M. Palmer New seafloor maps reveal that underwater faults off Southern California could result in a severe earthquake of up to 8.0 magnitude—with the added potential for tsunamis. The post California’s Quake Worries Don’t End With the San Andreas appeared first on WIRED.

Will Computers Redefine the Roots of Math?

By Kevin Hartnett When a legendary mathematician found a mistake in his own work, he embarked on a computer-aided quest to eliminate human error. To succeed, he has to rewrite the century-old rules underlying all of mathematics. The post Will Computers Redefine the Roots of Math? appeared first on WIRED.

A Surprise for Evolution in a Giant Tree of Life

By Emily Singer Researchers build the world’s largest evolutionary tree and conclude that species arise because of chance mutations—not natural selection. The post A Surprise for Evolution in a Giant Tree of Life appeared first on WIRED.